No Longer in Shadows, Pentagon’s U.F.O. Unit Will Make Some Findings Public


Despite Pentagon statements that it disbanded a once-covert program to analyze unidentified flying objects, the trouble stays underway — renamed and tucked contained in the Office of Naval Intelligence, the place officers proceed to review mystifying encounters between navy pilots and unidentified aerial automobiles.

Pentagon officers is not going to talk about this system, which isn’t categorized however offers with categorized issues. Yet it appeared final month in a Senate committee report outlining spending on the nation’s intelligence businesses for the approaching 12 months. The report stated this system, the Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon Task Force, was “to standardize collection and reporting” on sightings of unexplained aerial automobiles, and was to report a minimum of a few of its findings to the general public inside 180 days after passage of the intelligence authorization act.

While retired officers concerned with the trouble — together with Harry Reid, the previous Senate majority chief — hope this system will search proof of automobiles from different worlds, its most important focus is on discovering whether or not one other nation, particularly any potential adversary, is utilizing breakout aviation know-how that might threaten the United States.

Senator Marco Rubio, the Florida Republican who’s the performing chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, instructed a CBS affiliate in Miami this month that he was primarily involved about studies of unidentified plane over American navy bases — and that it was in the federal government’s curiosity to seek out out who was accountable.

The Pentagon program’s previous director, Luis Elizondo, a former military intelligence official who resigned in October 2017 after 10 years with the program, confirmed that the new task force evolved from the advanced aerospace program.

“It no longer has to hide in the shadows,” Mr. Elizondo said. “It will have a new transparency.”

Mr. Elizondo is among a small group of former government officials and scientists with security clearances who, without presenting physical proof, say they are convinced that objects of undetermined origin have crashed on earth with materials retrieved for study.

For more than a decade, the Pentagon program has been conducting classified briefings for congressional committees, aerospace company executives and other government officials, according to interviews with program participants and unclassified briefing documents.

In some cases, earthly explanations have been found for previously unexplained incidents. Even lacking a plausible terrestrial explanation does not make an extraterrestrial one the most likely, astrophysicists say.

Mr. Reid, the former Democratic senator from Nevada who pushed for funding the earlier U.F.O. program when he was the majority leader, said he believed that crashes of objects of unknown origin may have occurred and that retrieved materials should be studied.

“After looking into this, I came to the conclusion that there were reports — some were substantive, some not so substantive — that there were actual materials that the government and the private sector had in their possession,” Mr. Reid said in an interview.

No crash artifacts have been publicly produced for independent verification. Some retrieved objects, such as unusual metallic fragments, were later identified from laboratory studies as man-made.

Eric W. Davis, an astrophysicist who worked as a subcontractor and then a consultant for the Pentagon U.F.O. program since 2007, said that, in some cases, examination of the materials had so far failed to determine their source and led him to conclude, “We couldn’t make it ourselves.”

The constraints on discussing classified programs — and the ambiguity of information cited in unclassified slides from the briefings — have put officials who have studied U.F.O.s in the position of stating their views without presenting any hard evidence.

Mr. Davis, who now works for Aerospace Corporation, a defense contractor, said he gave a classified briefing to a Defense Department agency as recently as March about retrievals from “off-world vehicles not made on this earth.”

Mr. Davis said he also gave classified briefings on retrievals of unexplained objects to staff members of the Senate Armed Services Committee on Oct. 21, 2019, and to staff members of the Senate Intelligence Committee two days later.

Committee staff members did not respond to requests for comment on the issue.

Public fascination with the topic of U.F.O.s has drawn in President Trump, who told his son Donald Trump Jr. in a June interview that he knew “very interesting” things about Roswell — a city in New Mexico that is central to speculation about the existence of U.F.O.s. The president demurred when asked if he would declassify any information on Roswell. “I’ll have to think about that one,” he said.

Either way, Mr. Reid said, more should be made public to clarify what is known and what is not. “It is extremely important that information about the discovery of physical materials or retrieved craft come out,” he said.



Source link Nytimes.com

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