Fire Destroys Warehouse at Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco


About 150 firefighters battled a four-alarm blaze that destroyed 1 / 4 of the buildings on Pier 45 in San Francisco early on Saturday morning, the authorities stated.

One firefighter had a extreme reduce to an arm, Lt. Jonathan Baxter, a spokesman for the Fire Department, said at a news conference. He said the firefighter was taken to a hospital and was expected to recover. No other injuries were reported.

“We traditionally don’t have fires of this magnitude with warehouses,” Lieutenant Baxter said in an interview on Saturday, adding that the pier was being evaluated for structural integrity. “It was an impressive, massive fire.”

Lieutenant Baxter said that the fire was contained to the building and that “multiple walls on all four corners” had collapsed. He said the building was a total loss and had housed several businesses, ferry fleet offices and multiple independent crabbers and fishers.

Pier 45 had warehouses A, B, C and D, he said, and C was the one destroyed.

Lieutenant Baxter said that officials did not believe anyone was inside the building but that on occasion, people who were homeless had been found sleeping inside. Other local businesses were evacuated.

The vessel, which launched on June 19, 1943, and participated in the D-Day invasion in 1944, is one of about 2,700 so called Liberty ships. The ship, which is a tourist attraction moored at Pier 45, had been closed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

“We are happy to say that we have really saved the Jeremiah O’Brien, and we really secured the rear end of Pier 45,” Lieutenant Baxter said.

Laura Schaefer, a spokeswoman for Fisherman’s Wharf Community Benefit District, said the response from the city’s Fire Department and Police Department “was extremely quick and we are thankful that due to the rapid emergency response, the damage to the area was mitigated as much as possible.”

The district, a 30-square-block area with approximately 300 businesses, extends from Pier 39 to Ghirardelli Square in San Francisco’s northern waterfront.



Source link Nytimes.com

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