Black Man Died of Suffocation After Officers Put Hood on Him


A Black man died of suffocation in Rochester, N.Y., after law enforcement officials who had been taking him into custody put a hood over his head after which pressed his face into the pavement for 2 minutes, based on video and data launched by his household and native activists on Wednesday.

The man, Daniel Prude, 41, died on March 30, seven days after his encounter with the police, after being faraway from life help, his household mentioned.

His loss of life occurred two months earlier than the killing in police custody of George Floyd in Minneapolis set off protests throughout the United States. But it attracted widespread consideration solely on Wednesday when his household held a information convention to focus on disturbing video footage of the encounter taken from physique cameras that the law enforcement officials wore.

The New York State lawyer basic, Letitia James, and the Rochester police chief mentioned they had been investigating the loss of life. The officers concerned are nonetheless on the power.

Joe Prude, his brother, known as 911 on March 23 after Mr. Prude, who was visiting from Chicago, ran out of his dwelling in an erratic state. Mr. Prude had been taken to a hospital the day gone by after he apparently started experiencing psychological well being issues, police reviews present.

He was operating via the road after leaving his brother’s dwelling earlier than Rochester law enforcement officials detained him. A truck driver additionally known as 911 earlier than officers arrived, based on inner police investigations of the case, to say man sporting no garments was attempting to interrupt right into a automobile and saying that he had the coronavirus.

The video, first reported by the Democrat and Chronicle of Rochester, shows Mr. Prude, who has taken off his clothes, with his hands behind his back. He is standing on the pavement in handcuffs, shouting, before officers put a so-called spit hood on his head, apparently in an effort to prevent him from spitting on them. New York was in the early days of the coronavirus pandemic at the time.

After the hood is placed over Mr. Prude’s head, he becomes more agitated. At one point, he shouts, “Give me that gun. Give me that gun,” and three officers push him to the ground.

The video shows one officer placing both hands on Mr. Prude’s head and holding him against the pavement, while another places a knee on his back, even as the hood remains on his head.

One officer repeatedly tells Mr. Prude to “stop spitting” and to “calm down.”

After two minutes, Mr. Prude is no longer moving or speaking, and the same officer can be heard asking, “You good, man?”

The officer then notices that Mr. Prude had thrown up water onto the street.

A paramedic is called over, about five minutes after the officers placed the hood on Mr. Prude’s head, to perform CPR on him before he is put into an ambulance.

The Monroe County medical examiner ruled Mr. Prude’s death a homicide caused by “complications of asphyxia in the setting of physical restraint,” according to an autopsy report.

“Excited delirium” and acute intoxication by phencyclidine, or the drug PCP, were contributing factors, the report said.

The body camera video was provided to Elliot Dolby-Shields, a lawyer for Mr. Prude’s family, on Aug. 20 through an open records request, and then released to the public Wednesday after he and relatives reviewed the footage

At the news conference on Wednesday, activists and members of Mr. Prude’s family said the officers involved should be fired and charged with homicide, the Democrat and Chronicle reported. Joe Prude called the death a “coldblooded murder.”

“How many more brothers got to die for society to understand that this needs to stop,” Joe Prude said.

What happened to Mr. Prude was not an isolated episode, added Ashley Gantt, a local community organizer. “Daniel’s case is the epitome of what is wrong with this system,” Ms. Gantt said.

At a separate news conference, Rochester’s police chief, La’Ron D. Singletary, said he understood that people were angry about Mr. Prude’s death and frustrated about the lack of action in the matter, as well as about the delay in releasing the video.

“I know that there is a rhetoric that is out there that this is a cover-up,” Chief Singletary said. “This is not a cover-up.”

Later on Wednesday, more than 100 protesters gathered for hours in downtown Rochester outside a police station and marched to the street where Mr. Prude had been detained. The demonstration grew tense at times. Police officers, some of whom wore masks with Thin Blue Line flags, shot what appeared to be tear gas or pepper spray at protesters as they stood in a line across from them.

Attorney General James said in a statement that a unit in her office dedicated to investigating deaths in which the police are involved had already opened an inquiry.



Source link Nytimes.com

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